Australia

Victoria shatters records with 2,297 new COVID-19 cases and 11 deaths

Victoria’s chief health officer, Brett Sutton, said he could lift the bondage of Melbourne’s COVID-19 blockade by next weekend and waive his ban on home visits.

The state is moving at a pace to reach the 70% double vaccination target prior to the indicator date of October 26, triggering the end of Melbourne’s long-term sixth blockade.

Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton confirmed that a decision could be announced as early as this weekend, based on more reliable vaccination predictions and the number of cases in intensive care units and hospitals.

The state’s COVID-19 roadmap set home visits to be banned until 80% of the population of 16 or more were vaccinated with both.

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However, Professor Sutton said he was open to fine-tuning home collection limits at the 70 percent mark.

“I’ll do more if I can,” he told ABC Radio Wednesday afternoon.

“We are keenly aware of home gathering that leads to spikes, which was definitely a feature of the (AFL) Grand Final. They were people who weren’t usually gathered.

“It depends on the family. If you can limit the number, if you think epidemiology is okay, then (I) is absolutely open to it.”

Brett Sutton, Victoria's Chief Health Officer, speaks to the media at a press conference in Melbourne.

sauce: AAP


Professor Sutton said modeling at the Doherty Institute predicts that hundreds more people will die in the coming months as regulations are relaxed across the state.

“In reality, our seasonal flu causes an estimated 3,000 excessive deaths in Australia each year,” he said.

“That’s what we live with the flu every year, so we need to minimize death as much as possible.”

Meanwhile, Mitchell Shire, at the northern end of Melbourne, emerged from a local blockade on Wednesday midnight.

More coming …

Victoria shatters records with 2,297 new COVID-19 cases and 11 deaths Source link Victoria shatters records with 2,297 new COVID-19 cases and 11 deaths

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