Health

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne trials COVID-19 nasal swab

NS Murdoch Children’s Laboratory When Royal Childrens Hospital Melbourne is experimenting with new devices — Rhinomed Junior — Test children’s COVID-19.

The device is located at the base of the nose and collects virus particles for testing. A variety of colors and designs, such as mustaches and cat noses, greatly reduce the stress of the entire procedure.

Rhinomed Junior is currently attempting a PCR test at the Royal Children’s Hospital Drive-Through COVID-19 Testing Clinic. At this testing clinic, about 1500 children test COVID-19 each week.

Approximately 250 children between the ages of 4 and 18 will try the device in a 6-week trial and compare the results with “traditional” test methods.

Children, especially toddlers, often feel stressed during the test. Not only does this make it difficult to obtain samples, but it is also a pain for parents and the treating clinician.

The speed at which the device is inserted into the nose can be controlled by young people, resulting in less trauma for everyone.

Nasal cavities in limiting the spread of COVID-19 among the youngest Victorian people, as there are vaccines for children under the age of 12 that have not yet been approved and new variants continue to emerge. Swabs and inspections are still the most effective tools. It’s very important to keep it simple.

“Medical examination can be a horrifying experience for some children, but as we know, among young Victorians, Victorian Health Minister Martin Foley said. Testing is important in limiting the spread of COVID-19. “

“Rhinomed allows children to control the speed at which the swabs enter, which gives them a greater sense of control and greatly reduces the stress of the entire experience.”

Image credit: © stock.adobe.com / au / wladimir1804

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne trials COVID-19 nasal swab Source link The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne trials COVID-19 nasal swab

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