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How Latinxs Are Reclaiming Ancestral Healing Practices

Image source: Donkey

While the commoditization of wellness in the United States has historically served only privileged ones, the barriers to the practice of mindfulness have begun to weaken. As a result, more low-income color communities are embracing the overall lifestyle. For more and more Latino Americans, the adoption of wellness routines has been accompanied by a journey to healing their ancestors rooted in regaining long-demonized and forgotten lineal practices.

In the U.S., Latin American, and Caribbean communities, Latin Americans are increasingly seeking connections with the past, while secretly providing long-standing, proven treatment services rooted in the ancient practices of the region. Healer is out of the shadow. In fact, workshops and conversations aimed at educating groups about ancestral medicine and the violent colonial history that forced ancestors to practice these traditions personally over the past five years. There are many virtual and face-to-face communities that provide.

“I think we are aware of how much knowledge we have lost. The reason for this loss is that these oppressive systems due to colonization are wrong for us. Because he told me that. “

Peruvian-born creator Donkey said, “I think we are aware of how much knowledge we have lost. The reason for this loss is these oppressive systems due to colonization. But he told me that we were wrong. “Herbal consulting and education platform Flora Pacha, POPSUGAR Tell Latina.

According to donkeys, who use their synonyms, investigating and regaining ancestral traditions at the same time without learning the myth that Spanish colonists spread about indigenous people empowers and rebels against colonial projects. It is an act.

For the past 10 years, donkeys have had conversations with South American elders, Los Angeles and New Mexico. This process is political to the donkey, but it is also about collecting the drug and sharing it with others so that it will not be lost to the next generation.Through a podcast Wild weeds Loba offers herbal education aimed at reconnecting people to the land, as well as workshops and virtual classes.

Gardening has therapeutic benefits for individuals and communities, but it also has land benefits, especially when dealing with plants that have healing properties.

“When I think I’m connected to this land, this plant, or this water, I feel responsible for taking care of the land and water quality.”

“When I think I’m connected to this land, this plant, or this water, I feel responsible for managing the land and water quality. I understand that water can’t be wasted. It pollutes the environment. My health is interrelated with everything around me, “says Donkey.

“We have a deeply rooted tradition in postnatal care, which we believe is crucial and essential to the survival of all human beings.”

In Long Beach, California, healers, wellness coaches and Doula Panquetzani offer ancestral healing rooted in traditional Mesoamerican medicine through practice. Indige Mama.. She uses folk practices inherited from her family’s patriarch to support pregnant people, with a focus on reproductive health. However, according to Panquetzani, one of the many aspects that distinguishes Mexican private-sector childbirth activity from general symptomatic treatment is the prioritization of postnatal care.

“We have a deeply rooted tradition in postnatal care, which we believe is crucial and essential to the survival of all human beings,” Pankezani tells POPSUGAR Latina. “Western culture teaches us that we need to recover and continue our lives as usual. Sufficient time for society to restore these unrealistic expectations to postpartum families and them. We support it by putting it in a birth that does not give. “

Panquetzani has been providing traditional Mexican postpartum care for over a decade.These services include prominent bodywork such as: Sobadas, Or uterine massage. The built-in physical manipulation of the reproductive organs regulates the reproductive organs to release tension and provide emotional support.But it’s also built in Banos, Herbal infused bath; with tea Cardos, Bros; Not only community care such as childcare and support, but also parents can get the rest they need without worry.

“Western culture normalizes postpartum depression, becomes overwhelmed, lonely, and cries. These are all signs of a lack of healthy traditional postpartum care. Feeling lonely when receiving that care. No. Instead, I feel very hugged. “

“Western culture normalizes postpartum depression, becomes overwhelmed, lonely, and cries. These are all signs of a lack of healthy traditional postpartum care. Feeling lonely when receiving that care. No. Instead, I feel very hugged, “says Panquetzani. Healers who have developed and provided these practices in the past,Blue jas“(” Witch “) or”Curandero“(” Healer “) That they were labeled.

Practice is also deeply rooted in the healing of ancestors. According to Panquetzani, postpartum healing is one of the deepest and most sustainable ways to revive ancestors and heal together through the body.

“It’s just the joy of your ancestors. Your ancestors cry through you [and] They laugh through you. There is a communion that happens. When we return to our ancestral body of knowledge, we have a celebration of liberation that we have never felt before, “she says.

In Cuba, traditional healing is also linked to ancestral connections. Unlike Latin Americans in the United States, there is a similar resurgence of folk practices on Caribbean islands. However, these rituals and medicines have roots in different cultures throughout the history of the country. This includes the Tainos and enslaved Africans who have established their own Syncretist beliefs, namely Santeria, and the masses to work on sugar cane farms in the country in the early 20th century.

“We are regaining all of these years and history that many have tried to erase.”

“We are regaining all of these years and history that many have tried to erase,” said Baltimore-born Havana filmmaker, photographer, and herbalist Amberley Eileen. Ellis tells POPSUGAR Latina. “These practices have always existed, but have not been accepted. The knowledge of our ancestors is hidden, robbed of people, regaining what was done in the dark and revealing it. “

Use Regla SOULA plant-based wellness resource for Cubans co-founded by Ellis with her husband last year, she organizes healing workshops and events about ancestral customs that the community can incorporate into their daily lives. I am educating.

ReglaSOUL, with the help of local Afro-Cuba healers, farmers, wellness instructors, lake practitioners, spiritual leaders, activists and artists, provides general wellness and mental health in Cuba, especially the health of the people of the Regla municipality in Havana. And provide medicine to replace mental health.

Much of the work is educational and teaches the population how to identify specific plants and how to use them to create fusions that heal physical and mental illnesses. For example, local healers teach Cubans every day how guava leaves, which are easily found throughout the island, can be used to heal skin irritation such as eczema. It also describes how to put the leaves of Cecropia pelt in the Limpiesa bath, the physical, mental and emotional purification of negative energy and thoughts, and other plant-based rituals.

Learning these practices also means discovering ways in which previous generations have endangered their lives in order to carry on these traditions in secret.

“There is something that happens psychologically when people who look like you who come before you understand what they have done to protect themselves and future generations they did not know.”

“It can happen psychologically when people who look like you who come before you understand what they have done to protect themselves and future generations they didn’t know about,” she says. increase. “When you feel attacked by your race or hometown, knowing that people are thinking of you and looking for us is comforting and healing.”

Loba, Panquetzani, and Ellis all have different communities, different histories and ancestral traumas, and different regional plants, traditions, and spiritual rituals, so ancestral healing varies from Latin to Latin. I agree to see you. As such, they all encourage those interested in incorporating ancient healing into their wellness routines to deliberately establish relationships with their ancestors and hometowns.



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